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(203) 845-2200 coastal orthopaedics
Castle Connolly “Top Doctors 2017”

LOCATIONS:

Darien

36 Old Kings Highway South
Darien
Connecticut 06820

Norwalk

761 Main Ave Suite 115
Norwalk
Connecticut 06851

Call for Appointments

(203) 845-2200 coastal orthopaedics
Castle Connolly “Top Doctors 2017”

LOCATIONS:

Darien

36 Old Kings Highway South
Darien
Connecticut 06820

Norwalk

761 Main Ave Suite 115
Norwalk
Connecticut 06851

Elbow

Conditions

Normal Anatomy of the Elbow

The arm in the human body is made up of three bones that join together to form a hinge joint called the elbow. The upper arm bone or humerus connects from the shoulder to the elbow forming the top of the hinge joint. The lower arm or forearm consists of two bones, the radius and the ulna. These bones connect the wrist to the elbow forming the bottom portion of the hinge joint.

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Elbow Osteoarthritis

Coming soon

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Elbow Dislocation

The elbow is a hinge joint made up of 3 bones – humerus, radius and ulna. The bones are held together by ligaments to provide stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons move the bones around each other and help in performing various activities. Elbow dislocation occurs when the bones that make up the joint are forced out of alignment.

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Biceps Tendon Tear

The biceps muscle, located in the front of the upper arm allows you to bend the elbow and rotate the arm. Biceps tendons attach the biceps muscle to the bones in the shoulder and in the elbow.

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Throwing Injuries

An athlete uses an overhand throw to achieve greater speed and distance. Repeated throwing in sports such as baseball and basketball can place a lot of stress on the joints of the arm, and lead to weakening and ultimately, injury to the structures in the elbow.

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Olecranon (Elbow) Fractures

Three bones, humerus, radius and ulna make up the elbow joint. The bones are held together by ligaments thus providing stability to the joint. Muscles and tendons around the bones coordinate the movements and help in performing various activities. Elbow fractures may occur from trauma resulting from a variety of reasons, some of them being a fall on an outstretched arm, a direct blow to the elbow, or an abnormal twist to the joint beyond its functional limit.

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Elbow Fractures

The elbow is a complex hinge joint formed by the articulation of three bones- humerus, radius, and ulna. The upper arm bone or humerus connects the shoulder to the elbow forming the upper portion of the hinge joint. The lower arm consists of two bones- the radius and the ulna. These bones connect the wrist to the elbow forming the lower portion of the hinge joint.

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Elbow Sprain

Elbow sprain is an injury to the soft tissues of the elbow. It is caused due to stretching or tearing (partial or full) of the ligaments which support the elbow joint. Ligaments are a group of fibrous tissues that connect one bone to another in the body.

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Procedures

Elbow Arthroscopy

Elbow arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is performed through tiny incisions to evaluate and treat several elbow conditions.

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Elbow Ligament Reconstruction

The elbow is a complex joint of the upper limb formed by the articulation of the long bone of the upper arm or humerus and the two bones of the forearm, namely, radius and ulna. It is one of the important joints of the upper limb and is involved in basic movements such as flexion and extension of the upper limb and rotation of the forearm.

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Click on the topics below to find out more from the orthopaedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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